Agriculture

Open Data Revolution to Fight Global Hunger

USDA-NRCS rangeland scientist Emilio Carrillo uses an open data mobile app called LandPKS for sustainable land use management.

Every day, people around the world use data to make decisions.  When heading out of town, most of us use weather apps to check the forecast anywhere in the world before packing our bags.  However, when we travel to far-flung places, we may find ourselves packing food from home because we don’t know what may be available when we arrive.  We have a global, comprehensive, open data set that enables weather forecasting, but not something similar for food and agriculture?

In his first public remarks as head of USDA, Secretary Sonny Perdue noted that “…we want to make decisions based on facts and evidence,” “we want to be data-driven,” and “I need good data, I need good sound science to make decisions on…”

USDA recognizes that farmers, ranchers, and consumers alike – use data daily, from deciding when to plant, harvest or sell their crops, when to turn out cattle to pasture, or where to buy fresh fruits and vegetables.  This is why it is important that data be made available, open and accessible, to facilitate the best-informed decisions.

Around the world, a movement called the “open data revolution” is under way to make data available for public use.  This movement is expected to generate new insights, drive better decision-making, and enable governments, civil society, and the private sector to better target interventions and programs.

All of this is why the U.S. Government, led by USDA, was a founding partner of the Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN) initiative and why it continues to support the advancement of open data for agriculture and nutrition around the world.  Now with over 500 partners, GODAN continues to support the sharing of available, accessible, and usable open data for agriculture and nutrition to help ensure global food security.

If we’re going to feed over 9 billion people by 2050, we need open data policies to make decisions based on facts and evidence. This global perspective will help identify data already available and data gaps that exist, and sharpen the focus on how open data can foster innovation and collaborative research, creating whole new kinds of growth around the world.

Introducing New Rural Housing Data from USDA

For the first time, USDA’s Rural Housing Service is publicly releasing data across every program area in which the agency provides loans, guarantees, and grants—multifamily housing, single-family housing, and community facilities. This set of data will bring stakeholders and the public unprecedented insights into rural housing program delivery, impacts, challenges, and opportunities across the country. It will be updated regularly, so check back frequently for the latest release.

Click here for the data.

Mapping applications like PolicyMap are incorporating USDA’s rural housing data and overlaying them with other indicators.
Mapping applications like PolicyMap are incorporating USDA’s rural housing data and overlaying them with other indicators.

Arctic

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Launch of Energy & Infrastructure Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities, governments, businesses, and research institutions better understand and plan for the risks of storms, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is enhancing accessibility and releasing today a collection of datasets containing scientific and technical information that may help inform the current and potential future effects of climate change on energy and infrastructure.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to explore and develop insights for a number of relevant questions, such as:

1) How are fundamental energy resources impacted by climate?

2) How might changes in climate and natural resource availability impact energy conversion infrastructure and processes?

3) How might climate impact energy transmission and distribution systems?

4) How might energy demands be impacted by climate change, including heating and cooling but also energy losses and energy used for adaptation by other sectors?

5) What capacity do we currently have to adapt energy systems, and how might technology solutions, systems designs, and operational changes improve energy system resilience for climate change?

6) How might climate change impact energy infrastructure and its interactions with networked and interconnected infrastructure systems?

Climate

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

First International Conference on Surface Transportation System Resilience to Climate Change and Extreme Weather Events

September 16-18, 2015

The National Academy of Sciences Building
Washington, DC

The Transportation Research Board will host a conference September 16-18, 2015 to provide transportation professionals with information about emerging best practices and research results on how to adapt surface transportation networks to the potential impacts of climate change and extreme weather events. The conference will examine efforts to mainstream consideration of climate change and extreme weather resilience in all aspects of the transportation sector, including planning and programming, capital improvements, and operations and maintenance.

Coastal Flooding

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Launch of Energy & Infrastructure Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities, governments, businesses, and research institutions better understand and plan for the risks of storms, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is enhancing accessibility and releasing today a collection of datasets containing scientific and technical information that may help inform the current and potential future effects of climate change on energy and infrastructure.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to explore and develop insights for a number of relevant questions, such as:

1) How are fundamental energy resources impacted by climate?

2) How might changes in climate and natural resource availability impact energy conversion infrastructure and processes?

3) How might climate impact energy transmission and distribution systems?

4) How might energy demands be impacted by climate change, including heating and cooling but also energy losses and energy used for adaptation by other sectors?

5) What capacity do we currently have to adapt energy systems, and how might technology solutions, systems designs, and operational changes improve energy system resilience for climate change?

6) How might climate change impact energy infrastructure and its interactions with networked and interconnected infrastructure systems?

Ecosystem Vulnerability

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Launch of Energy & Infrastructure Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities, governments, businesses, and research institutions better understand and plan for the risks of storms, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is enhancing accessibility and releasing today a collection of datasets containing scientific and technical information that may help inform the current and potential future effects of climate change on energy and infrastructure.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to explore and develop insights for a number of relevant questions, such as:

1) How are fundamental energy resources impacted by climate?

2) How might changes in climate and natural resource availability impact energy conversion infrastructure and processes?

3) How might climate impact energy transmission and distribution systems?

4) How might energy demands be impacted by climate change, including heating and cooling but also energy losses and energy used for adaptation by other sectors?

5) What capacity do we currently have to adapt energy systems, and how might technology solutions, systems designs, and operational changes improve energy system resilience for climate change?

6) How might climate change impact energy infrastructure and its interactions with networked and interconnected infrastructure systems?

Energy

Introducing the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) redesigned International Energy Portal

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has redesigned its International Energy Portal to streamline navigation, simplify data presentation, and implement responsive design use. EIA based many of the redesigned aspects on customer feedback about the earlier beta release of the portal.

The International Energy Portal contains EIA’s country-level energy data. Users can view and download datasets for consumption, production, trade, reserves, and carbon dioxide emissions for different fuels and energy sources. The portal also provides access to EIA’s entire library of international reports, articles, and analyses, including Country Analysis Briefs.

Find data in fewer steps.

Users can select and explore prepopulated, fuel-specific default tables that provide annual data on energy production, consumption, trade, and reserves. Data options allow users to change time frequency and energy units, add sources and activities, and select other countries for comparison.

Customize data tables.

Customizable data tables allow users to sort by energy source and activity or by country and region. Users can now see and select countries within continental regions, International Energy Agency regions, and economic groups.

Tailor visualizations to user needs.

Animated maps allow users to see how trends in energy production, consumption, reserves, imports, and exports have changed over time. Other visualization options include heat maps, bubble maps, and time series.

Export data easily.

EIA’s international information is easily downloaded as data, maps, and charts for presentations, reports, and spreadsheets. Data downloads are available in CSV and JSON formats. Application Programming Interface (API) keys are available with EIA’s Microsoft Excel and Google Sheets add-ins, which make regular data updates much easier. Users can also download static versions of charts and tables in PDF or PNG image files.

Hourly Electric Grid Monitor reports new information on U.S. electricity demand, net generation, and interchange collected by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

To a federal statistical agency like the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), there’s nothing more satisfying than providing needed information that can facilitate more informed analysis and policy decisions on a national and regional level. EIA recently launched its new Hourly Electric Grid Monitor, a redesigned and enhanced version of EIA’s existing U.S. Electric System Operating Data website.  The data for the Hourly Electric Grid Monitor come from the Form EIA-930, Hourly and Daily Balancing Authority Operations Report, which collects hourly electricity demand, forecast demand, net generation, and interchange data from the 65 electricity balancing authorities that operate the electric grid in the Lower 48 states.  The Hourly Electric Grid Monitor incorporates two new data elements: hourly electricity generation by energy source and hourly subregional demand. The new website also provides new and more flexible options for visualizing the data and allows users to create custom dashboards that can be saved and shared.

Although electric system balancing authorities covering most of the United States have released real-time information on grid operations since the late 1990s, EIA’s Hourly Electric Grid Monitor expands the availability of data to the entire contiguous 48 states, and makes it available in a consistent format from a single source.

Among other applications, the data can be used to provide timely information on electric system recovery after power interruptions and to help evaluate the effects of renewable energy, smart grid, and demand-response programs on power system operations.  The tool allows you to visualize and analyze:

  • Total U.S. and regional electricity demand on an hourly basis
  • The varied mix of energy sources used to generate electricity at different times and locations
  • The hourly flow of electricity between electric systems
  • The wide variety in electric systems’ daily demand shapes and the seasonality of daily demand patterns
  • The extent to which electric systems rely on internal and external sources of supply to meet their demand
  • Potential stress on electric systems when actual demand significantly exceeds forecasted demand
  • Total hourly flows of electricity with Canada and Mexico

Have fun exploring!

Energy Infrastructure

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Launch of Energy & Infrastructure Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities, governments, businesses, and research institutions better understand and plan for the risks of storms, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is enhancing accessibility and releasing today a collection of datasets containing scientific and technical information that may help inform the current and potential future effects of climate change on energy and infrastructure.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to explore and develop insights for a number of relevant questions, such as:

1) How are fundamental energy resources impacted by climate?

2) How might changes in climate and natural resource availability impact energy conversion infrastructure and processes?

3) How might climate impact energy transmission and distribution systems?

4) How might energy demands be impacted by climate change, including heating and cooling but also energy losses and energy used for adaptation by other sectors?

5) What capacity do we currently have to adapt energy systems, and how might technology solutions, systems designs, and operational changes improve energy system resilience for climate change?

6) How might climate change impact energy infrastructure and its interactions with networked and interconnected infrastructure systems?

Food Resilience

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Launch of Energy & Infrastructure Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities, governments, businesses, and research institutions better understand and plan for the risks of storms, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is enhancing accessibility and releasing today a collection of datasets containing scientific and technical information that may help inform the current and potential future effects of climate change on energy and infrastructure.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to explore and develop insights for a number of relevant questions, such as:

1) How are fundamental energy resources impacted by climate?

2) How might changes in climate and natural resource availability impact energy conversion infrastructure and processes?

3) How might climate impact energy transmission and distribution systems?

4) How might energy demands be impacted by climate change, including heating and cooling but also energy losses and energy used for adaptation by other sectors?

5) What capacity do we currently have to adapt energy systems, and how might technology solutions, systems designs, and operational changes improve energy system resilience for climate change?

6) How might climate change impact energy infrastructure and its interactions with networked and interconnected infrastructure systems?

Human Health

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Launch of Energy & Infrastructure Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities, governments, businesses, and research institutions better understand and plan for the risks of storms, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is enhancing accessibility and releasing today a collection of datasets containing scientific and technical information that may help inform the current and potential future effects of climate change on energy and infrastructure.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to explore and develop insights for a number of relevant questions, such as:

1) How are fundamental energy resources impacted by climate?

2) How might changes in climate and natural resource availability impact energy conversion infrastructure and processes?

3) How might climate impact energy transmission and distribution systems?

4) How might energy demands be impacted by climate change, including heating and cooling but also energy losses and energy used for adaptation by other sectors?

5) What capacity do we currently have to adapt energy systems, and how might technology solutions, systems designs, and operational changes improve energy system resilience for climate change?

6) How might climate change impact energy infrastructure and its interactions with networked and interconnected infrastructure systems?

Maritime

By the numbers: port statistics for some of the largest U.S. ports

As intermodal connectors for domestic and international freight, our nation’s ports serve a critical role in numerous supply chains and the national economy. In recognition of this importance, the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act (P.L. 114-94; Dec. 4, 2015; 129 Stat. 1312) established a Port Performance Freight Statistics Program within the U.S. Department of Transportation: Bureau of Transportation Statistics. The first annual Port Performance Freight Statistics Program report provides descriptive statistics for a group of ports for year 2016, including the top 25 ports in terms of total tonnage, twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs), and dry bulk tonnage. The report is available to download at https://www.rita.dot.gov/bts/sites/rita.dot.gov.bts/files/PPFS_Annual_Report.pdf

The 2016 Port Performance report used multiple sources, including public datasets featured on Data.Gov. One foundational dataset used in the report is the total commercial tonnage carried on waterways published by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center.

Link to dataset: https://catalog.data.gov/dataset/total-tonnage-foreign-and-domestic-of-commodites-carried-on-commercial-waterways .

Example of cargo movement through a dry bulk cargo port terminal
            Typical infrastructure and cargo flow at a port terminal handling dry bulk cargo, such as coal.

Harvesting Grain Data

Author: Marin Kress, Research Scientist, Engineer Research and Development Center, USACE

This Grain Transportation Report: Rail Deliveries to Port dataset from the USDA provides the total number of rail carloads used in weekly grain shipments traveling to ports in five different regions of the country starting in 1994.  The five regions are Atlantic, East Gulf, Mississippi River, Texas Gulf, and Pacific.  In 2008 the dataset started recording cross border rail shipments in to Mexico.  Included with each record is start-of-week date, end-of-week date, and number week of year (1-52).  For users interested in learning about intermodal freight flows, agricultural exports, and how the marine transportation system supports American farmers this dataset is a great resource.

A glossary of terms used in the file is available from USDA at: https://www.ams.usda.gov/sites/default/files/media/GTRGlossaryofTerms.pdf

View Dataset link:  http://catalog.data.gov/dataset/grain-transportation-report-table-3

Reference: https://www.ams.usda.gov/services/transportation-analysis/gtr

Meta - The Data.gov Blog

Improving Access to Older Adult Health Data for Timely Use Amid COVID-19 and Beyond

Today marks the launch of the Older Adults Health Data Collection – a new resource cataloging over 200 Federal datasets previously available on Data.gov related to the health of older Americans. This centralized location will assist experts from academia, industry, government, civil society, and the public in accessing datasets from various Federal agencies and across a range of health-related issues (e.g. health status, health risks and behaviors, and health care) to advance our collective knowledge and understanding of the health of older adults.

Analyzing data on the older adult population in the time periods before, during, and after the pandemic is an important step to gaining a better understanding of both the health of this age group as well the immediate and long-term impacts of the pandemic. The Older Adults Health Data Collection contains datasets that capture outcomes directly related to COVID-19 as well as others that do not, and the number of COVID-19 related datasets in the collection is anticipated to grow over time. Datasets without COVID-19-specific data elements still provide important context on the health of older adults before the pandemic and are likely to incorporate COVID-19 data elements in their data collection procedures in the months and years to come.

Demographic trends underscore just how vital it will be to understand this growing population group. By 2030, one in five Americans will be 65 years and older. Over the next 40 years, the number of Americans 65 years and older will almost double.1 COVID-19 has also significantly impacted this age group, as underscored by evidence that older adults have experienced the highest hospitalization and morbidity rates from the pandemic.2 This is partly the result of older adults having high rates of chronic diseases, such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, arthritis, and cancer, which are the Nation’s leading drivers of illness, disability, deaths, and health care costs. 

Projected number of older adults in the United States1 Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)–associated hospitalization rates2
   


This new resource aligns with the intent of the Foundations for Evidence-Based Policymaking Act of 2018 and directives in the Federal Data Strategy 2020 Action Plan, both of which encourage increased public access to Government data, collaboration with non-Government entities, interagency collaboration, and protection of data security and confidentiality.  This data collection also supports the efforts of the Federal Interagency Forum on Aging Related Statistics, which aims to improve the quality and utility of data on the aging population.  Two of the Aging Forum’s goals include encouraging cross-national research on the aging population and promoting communication among data producers, researchers, and public policymakers. Additional non-health and non-Federal datasets related to older adults are available at agingstats.gov.

As the first national open data site, Data.gov is the ideal platform to provide a wide variety of stakeholders with access to the Older Adults Health Data Collection. Data in this collection has been made available in open formats while ensuring privacy and security, consistent with all applicable laws, regulations, and policies governing data use, disclosure, and sharing. By reducing the time spent searching for data on the health of older adults from hours to seconds, the Older Adults Health Data Collection serves as a helpful resource to put Federal data to work on behalf of Americans.

To access the Older Adults Health Data Collection, follow this link: https://catalog.data.gov/group/older-adults-health-data

Sources

  1. U.S. Census Bureau, 2017 National Population Projections.
  2. Garg S, Kim L, Whitaker M, et al. Hospitalization Rates and Characteristics of Patients Hospitalized with Laboratory-Confirmed Coronavirus Disease 2019 — COVID-NET, 14 States, March 1–30, 2020. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2020;69:458–4  64. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6915e3

 

Vijeth Iyengar, PhD, is a Policy Advisor at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

Mark C. Bicket, MD, PhD, is a White House Fellow at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

 

Hourly Electric Grid Monitor reports new information on U.S. electricity demand, net generation, and interchange collected by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

To a federal statistical agency like the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), there’s nothing more satisfying than providing needed information that can facilitate more informed analysis and policy decisions on a national and regional level. EIA recently launched its new Hourly Electric Grid Monitor, a redesigned and enhanced version of EIA’s existing U.S. Electric System Operating Data website.  The data for the Hourly Electric Grid Monitor come from the Form EIA-930, Hourly and Daily Balancing Authority Operations Report, which collects hourly electricity demand, forecast demand, net generation, and interchange data from the 65 electricity balancing authorities that operate the electric grid in the Lower 48 states.  The Hourly Electric Grid Monitor incorporates two new data elements: hourly electricity generation by energy source and hourly subregional demand. The new website also provides new and more flexible options for visualizing the data and allows users to create custom dashboards that can be saved and shared.

Although electric system balancing authorities covering most of the United States have released real-time information on grid operations since the late 1990s, EIA’s Hourly Electric Grid Monitor expands the availability of data to the entire contiguous 48 states, and makes it available in a consistent format from a single source.

Among other applications, the data can be used to provide timely information on electric system recovery after power interruptions and to help evaluate the effects of renewable energy, smart grid, and demand-response programs on power system operations.  The tool allows you to visualize and analyze:

  • Total U.S. and regional electricity demand on an hourly basis
  • The varied mix of energy sources used to generate electricity at different times and locations
  • The hourly flow of electricity between electric systems
  • The wide variety in electric systems’ daily demand shapes and the seasonality of daily demand patterns
  • The extent to which electric systems rely on internal and external sources of supply to meet their demand
  • Potential stress on electric systems when actual demand significantly exceeds forecasted demand
  • Total hourly flows of electricity with Canada and Mexico

Have fun exploring!

Ocean

Water Column Sonar Data Collection

NOAA collects and uses active acoustic (or sonar) data for a variety of mapping requirements. As the national archive for multibeam bathymetric data, NGDC manages over 15 million nautical miles of ship trackline data from sources worldwide. In 2011, NGDC, in partnership with NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), initiated a new archive for high resolution data collected with sonars capable of mapping the water column.

Water column sonar data are collected on NOAA fishery survey vessels and academic and international fleets, and are used to assess the physical and biological characteristics of the ocean. Primary uses include 3-D mapping of fish schools and other mid-water marine organisms, assessing biological abundance, species identification, and habitat characterization. These data are also useful for evaluating underwater gas seeps, remotely monitoring undersea oil spills, and bathymetry.

NGDC is working with scientists at NMFS and the Joint Hydrographic Center to ensure the long-term preservation and world-wide dissemination of these data.

Maritime Limits and Boundaries of the United States

NOAA is responsible for depicting on its nautical charts the limits of the 12 nautical mile Territorial Sea, 24 nautical mile Contiguous Zone, and 200 nautical mile Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). The outer limit of each of these zones is measured from the U.S. normal baseline, which coincides with the low water line depicted on NOAA charts and includes closing lines across the entrances of legal bays and rivers, consistent with international law.

Transportation

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

First International Conference on Surface Transportation System Resilience to Climate Change and Extreme Weather Events

September 16-18, 2015

The National Academy of Sciences Building
Washington, DC

The Transportation Research Board will host a conference September 16-18, 2015 to provide transportation professionals with information about emerging best practices and research results on how to adapt surface transportation networks to the potential impacts of climate change and extreme weather events. The conference will examine efforts to mainstream consideration of climate change and extreme weather resilience in all aspects of the transportation sector, including planning and programming, capital improvements, and operations and maintenance.

Tribal Nations

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Launch of Energy & Infrastructure Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities, governments, businesses, and research institutions better understand and plan for the risks of storms, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is enhancing accessibility and releasing today a collection of datasets containing scientific and technical information that may help inform the current and potential future effects of climate change on energy and infrastructure.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to explore and develop insights for a number of relevant questions, such as:

1) How are fundamental energy resources impacted by climate?

2) How might changes in climate and natural resource availability impact energy conversion infrastructure and processes?

3) How might climate impact energy transmission and distribution systems?

4) How might energy demands be impacted by climate change, including heating and cooling but also energy losses and energy used for adaptation by other sectors?

5) What capacity do we currently have to adapt energy systems, and how might technology solutions, systems designs, and operational changes improve energy system resilience for climate change?

6) How might climate change impact energy infrastructure and its interactions with networked and interconnected infrastructure systems?

Water

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Launch of Energy & Infrastructure Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities, governments, businesses, and research institutions better understand and plan for the risks of storms, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is enhancing accessibility and releasing today a collection of datasets containing scientific and technical information that may help inform the current and potential future effects of climate change on energy and infrastructure.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to explore and develop insights for a number of relevant questions, such as:

1) How are fundamental energy resources impacted by climate?

2) How might changes in climate and natural resource availability impact energy conversion infrastructure and processes?

3) How might climate impact energy transmission and distribution systems?

4) How might energy demands be impacted by climate change, including heating and cooling but also energy losses and energy used for adaptation by other sectors?

5) What capacity do we currently have to adapt energy systems, and how might technology solutions, systems designs, and operational changes improve energy system resilience for climate change?

6) How might climate change impact energy infrastructure and its interactions with networked and interconnected infrastructure systems?